2017 Southern Regional IDA Conference Program Agenda Announced


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2017 Southern Regional IDA Conference

March 24 and 25, 2017
Hilton Hotel, Greenville, SC


“Dyslexia: Discovering New Pathways to Learning”

Hosted by the South Carolina, North Carolina, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, and Louisiana Branches of the International Dyslexia Association

Our Sponsors

  • Platinum Level: Wilson Reading System
  • Gold Level: Camperdown Academy, EPS Literacy and Intervention
  • Silver Level: Camp Spring Creek Key School and Learning Center

CONFERENCE AGENDA


Friday March 24, 2017

5:30-6:00 pm
Registration

6:00 pm
Conference Kick-Off with Aidan A. Colvin, author of Looking for Heroes: One Boy, One Year, 100 Letters
An estimated 13 million students in the United States have dyslexia, a neurologic disorder that impairs reading. Reading quickly and accurately is often the key to success in school. Without it, many dyslexics struggle and fail. Some, however, go on to achieve wild success. How?

In this true story, dyslexic high school student Aidan Colvin decides to ask them. Over the course of one year, he writes 100 letters to successful dyslexics. He doesn’t expect anyone to write back and is genuinely surprised when people do. This book features letters from Writer John Irving, Arctic Explorer Ann Bancroft, Surgeon and CEO Delos Cosgrove, Sculptor Thomas Sayre, Poet Phillip Schultz and others. It also features conversations with Comedian Jay Leno and Filmmaker Harvey Hubbell.

This is a story about growing up, fostering grit and humor in the face of challenges, and seeing one’s differences in a new light. It is also a story about the importance of heroes — for kids like Aidan, but also for anyone. Throughout the book, Aidan shares tips that have helped him succeed in the classroom.

7:00-10:00 pm
“Music of the South” featuring Caleb Fletcher and a Charleston Jazz Band
Caleb Fletcher is a singer/songwriter from the South. With a sound that blends folk, Americana, and a little country, Caleb Fletcher produces a vibe that truly reflects his southern roots and laid-back attitude. “A new-age Paul Simon,” with “a story-telling style of writing and finger-picking like that of James Taylor,” Fletcher creates original music and lyrics that show a mature and soulful outlook beyond his years. He recently released a new EP, Where It Comes From, an organic, grassroots group of songs with rich acoustic layers, sweet harmonies, and even a little grit here and there.

Caleb has played festivals in the Carolinas, including the Reedy River Concert Series and Artisphere, as well as popular venues like The Handlebar and Smiley’s Acoustic Café. He now resides in Nashville, TN, and has begun to make some waves within Music City. He was a resident player in a few venues off of Broadway, including Jimmy Buffett’s Margaritaville, and also played the Hard Rock Café. He has toured throughout the region, making stops in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, the Carolinas, Kentucky, and Tennessee. Caleb is currently promoting his new record and working on plans for a more extensive tour in the new year.

8:00-10:00 pm
Vendor/Exhibitor Room Open


Saturday March 25, 2017

7:00-8:00 am
Registration; Visit Vendors/Exhibitors

8:00-10:30 am
Keynote Speaker Dr. Maryanne Wolf
Dr. Maryanne Wolf, Tufts University is the John DiBiaggio Professor of Citizenship and Public Service Director, Center for Reading and Language Research. She is the author of the “RAVE-O Intervention Program,” an evidence-based fluency comprehension program for struggling readers that has proven successful in two major federal studies. She received the Norman Geschwind Lecture Award from the International Dyslexia Association for neuroscience research in dyslexia. She has edited the book, Dyslexia, Fluency, and the Brain and is the author of Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain, Letters to the Good Reader: The Contemplative Dimension in the Future Reading Brain, and What It Means to Read: A Literacy Agenda for the Digital Age.

Dr. Wolf will focus on insights from cognitive neuroscience on reading, dyslexia, and digital culture. She will discuss very new data on the prediction in KINDERGARTEN of specific subtypes of dyslexia. That is, we can tell before they learn to read, where their areas of deficit will be and thus what kinds of intervention are best used. There are also discrete brain activation patterns showing up for each subtype.

10:30-11:00 am
Break

11:00 am-12:00 pm
Session I

Strands: P – Parent; T–Teacher/Tutor; O–Other (Administrator, Professional, Home School, Student, etc.)
Grades: EC–Early Childhood; E–Elementary; M–Middle; HS–High School; PHS–Post HS/Adult

I-A
“Multi-Sensory Math Methodologies for Students with Dyscalculia and Other Learning Difficulties” – Dan Sinclair, Teach 4 Mastery, Inc., CA
Students with visual-spatial and language processing difficulties often struggle to understand and process the intricacies of mathematics. This workshop will present methodologies that have been used in small group and individual instruction settings to increase the students’ ability to make connections using multi-sensory, concrete representations. Participants will leave with information and access to tools to teach students immediately.
(P, T, O, E, M, HS)

I-B
“Writing From Text Sources” – Joan Sedita, Keys to Literacy, MA
Participants will learn instructional practices to help students write responses to prompts based on text sources, including text highlighting and annotating, gathering information into notes, and using a graphic organizer to organize a written response. Explicit instruction through think aloud will be modeled, and scaffolds to support struggling writers will be shared.
(T, O, E, M, HS, PHS)

I-C
“Building Reading Stamina and a Growth Mindset” – Nancy Duggin, Ed.S., NBCT, Independent Consultant, TN
The percentage of students who are unable to read is relatively low; however, the percentage of students who quit reading as material becomes more challenging is significant. This session will provide strategies for building stamina and perseverance while reading. We will consider how to create a “growth mindset” within students.
(P, T, O, E, M)

I-D
“Implications of Portrayals of Dyslexia in Popular Culture” – Dr. Kelly Harrison Maguire and Dr. Sheryl Cowart Moss, Converse College, SC
Portrayals of individuals with dyslexia in popular culture include a variety of formats. This presentation will include an inventory of these portrayals, measurements of portrayals, and descriptions of how individuals respond to portrayals. Implications of this research for individuals with dyslexia, educators, parents, and the broader public will be discussed.
(P, T, O, EC, E, M, HS, PHS)

I-E
“Vivacious Vocabulary Instruction” – Lisa Murray and Janet Street, The Schenck School, GA
Because many dyslexic students have a vocabulary deficit that persists and is directly correlated to reading comprehension, it is vital to provide direct instruction on the meaning and usage of high frequency words. This fun and interactive session will demonstrate how to effectively teach vocabulary so that students retain the meanings of important, high-frequency words.
(T, O, E, M, HS)

I-F
“The Augustine Literacy Project®: Tutor One Child-Change Two Lives” – Debbie McCarthy, Ann Copeland, Kris Cox, and Alison Houser, Augustine Literacy Project® of the Triangle, NC
ALP Chapter Directors from 4 cities will share the ALP story. Learn how this non-profit has, for 24 years, trained and supported volunteer tutors who offer free, long-term, one-to-one, Orton-Gillingham (OG)-based instruction to low-income struggling readers in grades K-12. Guidelines for starting a replication chapter in your community will be provided.
(P, T, O, EC, E, M, HS)

I-G
“Dyslexia: Parents Make the Difference – Educate, Advocate, Legislate” – Tricia Gerard, M.Ed., NBCT, CDP/IDA, Dyslexia, Learning, and Support Group, ireadingtutor.com, decodingliteracy.com, FL
Inform parents how to start a collaborative change agent between the school district literacy departments, and community groups to effectively drive change for appropriate instructions for dyslexics within your school district.
(P, PHS)

I-H
“Increasing Orthographic Awareness” – Pat Sekel, Ph.D., CALT, QI, CDT/IDA, National Educational Consultant, FLIDA President, FL
This presentation discusses the reasons and urgent need for educators to incorporate orthographic awareness into their teaching to maximize their students’ reading and spelling ability. Students in general and students with dyslexia, in particular, frequently fail to notice how words are formed, change spelling and pronunciation through the addition of affixes, and how orthographic awareness impacts reading comprehension and spelling.
(P, T, O, EC, E, M, HS, PHS)

I-I
“Multisensory Keyboarding Using Diana H. King’s Keyboarding Skills and Google Docs” – Concha Wyatt, M.A.Ed., F/AOGPE and Karen Edwards, Key School and Learning Center at Carolina Day School, NC
Using Diana H. King’s Keyboarding Skills, the presenters have developed an Orton-Gillingham (OG)-based approach to teaching keyboarding that utilizes the Google Docs platform. Learn how to apply the OG lesson plan format to keyboarding instruction. With this approach, students learn accurate, rapid keyboarding, a critical skill for academic and career success.
(T, E, M, HS, PHS)

 I-J
“More Success with Less Stress: Learn to LOVE Learning!” – Hettie Johnson, M.A., CCC-SLP, Private Practice, AL
Emotionally sound teaching is a basic tenet of the Orton-Gillingham approach. The brain must feel safe in order to learn, but students with learning disabilities often experience brain shut-down as a result of fear, anxiety, and frustration. This presentation will teach explicit brain-friendly strategies to tame anxiety, avoid brain shut-down, build self-confidence, and enable the brain to learn more successfully, using the Amygdala SPA. The letters SPA stand for Self-talk, Positive mistake correction, Advocate for yourself. These powerful strategies help the student keep the amygdala happy in order to release brain-friendly neurotransmitters which strengthen memory and help the brain associate pleasure with learning, resulting in enhanced motivation and love of learning. The added power of SWAG (multisensory teaching/Study With All Gears) in keeping the amygdala happy will also be discussed.
(P, T, O, EC, E, M, HS, PHS)

12:00-1:30 pm
Lunch on Your Own
Food Trucks will be available in the side parking lot right near the vendors/exhibitors (Palmetto Ballroom); Visit Vendors/Exhibitors

1:30-2:30 pm
Session II

Strands: P – Parent; T–Teacher/Tutor; O–Other (Administrator, Professional, Home School, Student, etc.)
Grades: EC–Early Childhood; E–Elementary; M–Middle; HS–High School; PHS–Post HS/Adult

II-A
“How Low Can You Go? Using Assistive Technology for Reading Comprehension in the Early Grades” – Jennifer Topple, Chair, International Dyslexia Association, and Kim Papastavridis, Howard School, GA
When is it beneficial for a child to use text-to-speech technology? Does AT help or hinder independent reading? Does it take the place of comprehension strategies? An Assistive Technology Expert and a Speech Language Pathologist give you the lowdown on the who, how, and what of using assistive technology with younger struggling readers. Audience members should leave this session with answers to the following: How do you feed students material at the level of their intellect? Why stay at intellect level for comprehension? How do you tease out what’s holding them up in comprehension?
(P, T, O, EC, E)

II-B
“Assertive Skills for Students, Educators, and Parents” – Gloria Hash Marcus, Halsey Counseling and Educational Center, SC
Assertive Skills provide a vehicle for assisting students and adults in developing better communication skills and self-esteem. Participants will be exposed to four communication styles. Self-advocacy skills will be explored in conjunction with assertive skills. Coping strategies that enhance assertive skills will also be reviewed and useful exercises will be presented.
(P, T, O, EC, E, M, HS, PHS)

II-C
“Improving Motor Memory” – Susie van der Vorst, F/AOGPE, Camp Spring Creek, NC
It’s eye-opening to realize how the evolution of both technology and child rearing trends have altered our children’s development over the past 20 years. This timely session will help participants rediscover underused activities and put them to use helping children build motor memory and fine-motor skills that not only allow for greater fluidity of thought, but also enhance writing skills.
(P, T, O, EC, E)

II-D
“Project Read Framing Your Thoughts Written Expression” – Priscilla Allen, Language Circle/ Project Read, MN
The Project Read Written Expression curriculum and instructional strategies inspire and energize students as they learn the fundamentals of writing. This curriculum uses unique graphic symbols to teach written language sequentially and systematically blending creative freedom with direct multi-sensory skill instruction. The process is taught through direct instruction using visual, auditory, kinesthetic, and tactile teaching strategies.
(P, T, O, EC, E, M, HS, PHS)

II-E
“What’s the Story? Using Narrative Structure to Teach Critical Thinking, Social Emotional and Academic Skills” – Stacey Crowley, MA, CCC-SLP, Learning Tree Literacy, Inc., NC
Cognitive scientists tell us that most of our human experience is organized as story, yet children with language-based learning differences often struggle with storytelling. Learn how explicit teaching of narrative structure using a multi-sensory strategy and authentic literature can strengthen students’ oral communication, social emotional skill, and academic functioning.
(P, T, O, EC, E, M, HS, PHS)

II-F
“Successful Integration of the Orton-Gillingham Approach Into Your School’s Reading Curriculum” – Dr. Christina Sprout, Bob Jones Academy, SC
Teachers can integrate Orton-Gillingham techniques alongside an existing reading program, and it is proven that it can work successfully. My dissertation study integrated Orton-Gillingham instruction by following the same order of phonics skills as listed in the school curriculum scope and sequence. Improvement scores revealed statistically significant results on all decoding and encoding subtests favoring the entire population of the treatment group. We will discuss the research that shows this can be done, as well as strategies on how to make it happen in the classroom.
(P, T, O, EC, E)

II-G
“Spelling Error Analysis: What do Spelling Errors Tell Us?” – Jan Wasowicz, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Founder, President, and CEO Learning by Design, Inc., IL
Effective literacy instruction is guided by assessment data that pinpoints a student’s linguistic deficits, telling you exactly what type of language instruction is needed. Spelling errors reveal student’s underlying language deficits. You’ll practice spelling error analysis methods to identify specific language deficits and match literacy intervention with student need.
(T, O, EC, E, M, HS, PHS)

II-H
“College Admissions Tests and LD and ADHD Documentation Guidelines: Consistency with Emerging Legal Guidance” – Jennifer H. Lindstrom, Ph.D., Will Lindstrom, Ph.D., Regents’ Center for Learning Disorders, University of Georgia, GA
Recent legal developments suggest changes in federal enforcement of relevant laws for documenting LD and ADHD for accommodations on college admissions tests are imminent. The presenters will review the developments and compare the documentation guidelines of 10 commonly administered admissions tests within the context of the changing landscape.
(P, O, HS, PHS)

II-I
“Creativity and Dyslexia: The Importance of a Fine Arts Education” – Gladys Schaefer, James Cormier, and Mollie Schaefer, Spring Valley School, AL
Creativity and dyslexia go together like peanut butter and jelly. The fine arts offer those with learning challenges the ability to shine. From pottery to painting, from drama to dance, the arts can help struggling students find their day in the sun. A collaborative panel will share the stories and the research behind this phenomenon. A medical illustrationist turned artist and science teacher, a college senior who sits on her state’s Art Consortium, and a parent who nurtured her dyslexic children’s artistic journeys will come together with tales to enlighten and inspire.
(P, T, O, EC, E, M HS, PHS)

II-J
“A Review of Psychological Evaluations” – Andrew Mantini, Ph.D., Sprouting Minds – Private Practice Specializing in Psychological Assessment, SC
This session will provide an in-depth review of psychological evaluations from start to finish. A licensed psychologist will share how the evaluations are used to diagnose and treat dyslexia. This session will also include helpful tips for navigating a seemingly complicated process to ensure positive results.
(P, T, O, EC, E, M, HS, PHS)

2:30-2:45 pm
Break

2:45-3:45 pm
Session III

Strands: P – Parent; T–Teacher/Tutor; O–Other (Administrator, Professional, Home School, Student, etc.)
Grades: EC–Early Childhood; E–Elementary; M–Middle; HS–High School; PHS–Post HS/Adult

III-A
“Raising the Reading Bar” – Ava H. White, Academy of Innovation, GA
Most of our students come to us 2-4 years behind in reading; some are even non-readers. After students receive research-based instruction and gain proficiency in reading, they still are resistant, reluctant, and repel the notion of reading, much less reading for pleasure. The last 3 years, the staff at the Academy of Innovation have made a concerted effort to convert these reticent students into ready and willing readers who now voluntarily read or listen to books for fun. We will share our resources and strategies so that teachers can learn how to successfully lure their students from electronic games to books.
(P, T, E, M, HS)

III-B
“Working Your Words: Meaningful, Multisensory, and Structured Vocabulary Development” – Candace Seller, M.Ed., F/AOGPE, CALT, Key School and Key Learning Center at Carolina Day School, NC
Looking for ways to enhance vocabulary instruction? This interactive session will use make-and-take activities, the study of morphology, and multisensory strategies to develop ways to weave in vocabulary study into the work you are already doing with your students. Take it back and use it on Monday!
(P, T, EC, E, M, HS, PHS)

III-C
“Multi-Sensory Math Methodologies for Students with Dyscalculia and Other Learning Difficulties” – Dan Sinclair, Teach 4 Mastery, Inc., CA
Students with visual-spatial and language processing difficulties often struggle to understand and process the intricacies of mathematics. This workshop will present methodologies that have been used in small group and individual instruction settings to increase the students’ ability to make connections using multi-sensory, concrete representations. Participants will leave with information and access to tools to teach students immediately.
(P, T, O, E, M, HS)

III-D
“Effective Teacher Training” – Kayla Steltenkamp, Dyslexia Researcher-Northern Kentucky University, KY
This presentation discusses the research completed by Kayla Steltenkamp that investigated the effectiveness of professional development for teachers using simulation, lecture, and mixed-method design. Discussion will also include state level requirements and working task force ideas for the state of Kentucky.
(T, O, EC, E, M, HS)

III-E
“Keys to Comprehension: Topic Webs, Two-Column Notes, Summarizing” – Joan Sedita, Keys to Literacy, MA
Participants will learn a trio of comprehension strategies that students use in any subject area text. A topic web graphic organizer provides a “big picture” of text topics and main ideas; two-column notes including main ideas and key details support meta-cognition while reading; and summarizing supports information processing after reading.
(T, O, E, M, HS, PHS)

III-F
“Serving Students with Dyslexia: S.P.I.R.E. and Camperdown Academy” – Julie Ross, EPS/ School Specialty, MA, and Heidi Bishop, Fellow/AOGPE, CDT/IDA, Immediate Past President/SCBIDA, and Director of Transitions, Outreach, and OG Teacher Training, Camperdown Academy, SC
This session will focus on how to give dyslexic children the skills and confidence they need to achieve their reading goals. The presenters will review current research on struggling readers and demonstrate effective multisensory teaching techniques using S.P.I.R.E. Heidi Bishop will share her personal experiences with S.P.I.R.E. from Camperdown Academy, an OG accredited school and training site that works with dyslexic children.
(P, T, O, PS, EC, E, M, H, PHS)

III-G
“Preparing Johnny for College: Expectations, Planning, and Learning” – Susan R. Flaherty, Johnson & Wales University, NC
This session will include a brief overview of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) in relation to college, documentation requirements to receive accommodations in college, and helpful strategies for a positive transition to college. Independent multisensory learning strategies and their application at the college level will conclude the session.
(P, O, HS, PHS)

III-H
“Multisensory Magic: Engaging the Senses So That Learning Sticks” – Jennifer Hasser, M.Ed., Kendore Learning, GA
In this lively workshop, participants will learn games and activities to teach and reinforce instruction in one-on-one or classroom settings. We will discuss the research-based reasons why these games work. Participants should be prepared to move, have fun, and look at learning in a refreshing way. Techniques support Orton-Gillingham/MSL teaching.
(P, T, O, EC, E, M)

III-I
“Dynamic Diagramming for Dyslexics” – Lisa Murray and Janet Street, The Schenck School, GA
Understanding grammar allows students to analyze and discuss their writing, but grammar can be confusing to dyslexic students. Diagramming sentences gives students a new, multisensory tool for interacting with these concepts using a unique, visual-spatial approach. This fun interactive session will teach participants how to use this helpful method.
(T, O, E, M, HS)

3:45-4:00 pm
Break

4:00-5:00 pm
Wrap-Up Speaker
Dr. Stephen Dykstra, International Foundation for Effective Reading Intervention – Reading is the “great vaccine.” Academic success (of which reading is the earliest essential part) protects us from almost every bad thing, like a vaccine. Resilience is a vital reserve which is being both spent and renewed all the time. Children who can read have a chance to come to school and succeed, leaving at the end of the day with more resilience than when they arrived. Children who cannot read will always go home with less.

6:00 pm
Buses will start taking trips to downtown Greenville

9:00 -11:00 pm
Buses will begin picking up from downtown Greenville to bring back to the Hilton


Sessions Available by:

Strands
P – Parent; T–Teacher/Tutor; O–Other (Administrator, Professional, Home School, Student, etc.)

Parent

Session I: A, C, D, F, G, H, J

Session II: A, B, C, D, E, F, H, I, J

Session III: A, B, C, F, G, H

Teacher

Session I: A, B, C, D, E, F, H, I, J

Session II: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, I, J

Session III: A, B, C, D, E, F, H, I

Other

Session I: A, B, C, D, E, F, H, J

Session II: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J

Session III: C, D, F, G, H, I

Grades
EC–Early Childhood; E–Elementary; M–Middle; HS–High School; PHS–Post HS/Adult

Early Childhood

Session I: D, F, H

Session II: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, I, J

Session III: B, D, F, H,

Elementary

Session I: A, B, C, D, E, F, H, I, J

Session II: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, I, J

Session III: A, B, C, D, E, F, H, I

Middle

Session I: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J

Session II: B, D, E, G, I, J
Session III: A, B, C, D, E, F, H, I

High School

Session I: A, B, D, E, F, H, I, J

Session II: B, D, E, G, H, I, J

Session III: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, I

Post High School/Adult

Session I: B, D, H, I, J

Session II: B, D, E, G, H, I, J

Session III: B, E, F, G